Ellen White Topics
The religion of Jesus Christ. . . is the immediate, voluntary, trustful surrender of the heart to God - a coming into union with Christ in confidence, affectionate obedience to do all His commandments through the merits of Jesus Christ. It is a decisive act of the individual, committing to the Lord the keeping of the soul. It is the climbing up by Christ, clinging to Christ, accepting the righteousness of Christ as a free gift. The will is to be surrendered to Christ. Through faith in the righteousness of Christ is salvation. 1888 281

There is need of constant watchfulness, and of earnest, loving devotion: but these will come naturally when the soul is kept by the power of God through faith. We can do nothing, absolutely nothing, to commend ourselves to [354] divine favour. We must not trust at all to ourselves nor to our good works; but when as erring, sinful beings we come to Christ, we may find rest in His love. God will accept every one that comes to Him trusting wholly in the merits of a crucified Saviour. Love springs up in the heart. There may be no ecstasy of feeling, but there is an abiding, peaceful trust. Every burden is light; for the yoke which Christ imposes is easy. Duty becomes a delight, and sacrifice a pleasure. The path that before seemed shrouded in darkness becomes bright with beams from the Sun of Righteousness. This is walking in the light as Christ is in the light. 1SM 353

In order to meet the requirements of the law, our faith must grasp the righteousness of Christ, accepting it as our righteousness. Through union with Christ, through acceptance of His righteousness by faith, we may be qualified to work the works of God, to be colabourers with Christ. 1SM 374

Brethren and sisters, it is by beholding that we become changed. By dwelling upon the love of God and our Saviour, by contemplating the perfection of the divine character and claiming the righteousness of Christ as ours by faith, we are to be transformed into the same image. 5T 744

The righteousness which Christ taught is conformity of heart and life to the revealed will of God. Sinful men can become righteous only as they have faith in God, and maintain a vital connection with Him. Then true godliness will elevate the thoughts and ennoble the life. Then the external forms of religion accord with the Christian's internal purity. Then the ceremonies required in the service of God are not meaningless rites, like those of the hypocritical Pharisees. DA 310

It is thus that every sinner may come to Christ. "Not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to His mercy He saved us."[1 TITUS 3:5.] When Satan tells you that you are a sinner, and cannot hope to receive blessing from God, tell him that Christ came into the world to save sinners. We have nothing to recommend us to God; but the plea that we may urge now and ever is our utterly helpless condition, that makes His redeeming power a necessity. Renouncing all self-dependence, we may look to the cross of Calvary and say,--

"In my hand no price I bring;
Simply to Thy cross I cling." DA 317

This truth (sabbath), with others included in the message, is to be proclaimed; but the great centre of attraction, Christ Jesus, must not be left out. It is at the cross of Christ that mercy and truth meet together, and righteousness and peace kiss each other. The sinner must be led to look to Calvary; with the simple faith of a little child he must trust in the merits of the Saviour, accepting His righteousness, believing in His mercy. GW 156

[28.7] My ideas concerning justification and sanctification were confused. These two states were presented to my mind as separate and distinct from each other; yet I failed to comprehend the difference or understand the meaning of the terms, and all the explanations of the preachers increased my difficulties. I was unable to claim the blessing for myself, and wondered if it was to be found only among the Methodists, and if, in attending the advent meetings, I was not shutting my self away from that which I desired above all else,--the sanctifying Spirit of God.

[36.1] (Later, through a dream) ...the beauty and simplicity of trusting in God began to dawn upon my soul.

[39.2] Faith now took possession of my heart. I felt an inexpressible love for God, and had the witness of His Spirit that my sins were pardoned. My views of the Father were changed. I now looked upon Him as a kind and tender parent, rather than a stern tyrant compelling me to a blind obedience. My heart went out to Him in deep and fervent love. Obedience to His will seemed a joy; it was a pleasure to be in His service. No shadow clouded the light that revealed to me the perfect will of God. I felt the assurance of an indwelling Saviour, and realised the truth of what Christ had said: "He that followeth Me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life." John 8:12.

[39.9] My whole endeavour was to do the will of God, and keep Jesus and heaven continually in mind. I was surprised and enraptured with the clear views now presented to me of the atonement and the work of Christ. LS 28,36,39

Righteousness is obedience to the law. The law demands righteousness, and this the sinner owes to the law; but he is incapable of rendering it. The only way in which he can attain to righteousness is through faith. By faith he can bring to God the merits of Christ, and the Lord places the obedience of His Son to the sinner's account. Christ's righteousness is accepted in place of man's failure, and God receives, pardons, justifies, and loves him as He loves His son. This is how faith is accounted righteousness. RH NOV.4,1890 (FW 101)

The condition of eternal life is now just what it always has been - just what it was in Paradise before the fall of our first parents, -perfect obedience to the law of God, perfect righteousness. [62.7] If you give yourself to Him, and accept Him as your Saviour, then, sinful as your life may have been, for His sake you are accounted righteous. Christ's character stands in place of your character, and you are accepted before God just as if you had not sinned. SC 62

Knowing himself to be a sinner, a transgressor of the holy law of God, he (the sinner) looks to the perfect obedience of Christ, to His death upon Calvary for the sins of the world; and he has the assurance that he is justified by faith in the merit and sacrifice of Christ. He realises that the law was obeyed in his behalf by the Son of God, and that the penalty of transgression cannot fall upon the believing sinner. The active obedience of Christ clothes the believing sinner with the righteousness that meets the demands of the law. SD 240

The sinner's position before God is then that of one whose sins are forgiven, whose transgressions are covered, and he becomes a partaker `of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust' [2 Pet. 1:4]. A new element of life and power is imparted, which cannot be accepted and received by man until he views Christ as his only hope; then through Christ he discerns the magnitude of his guilt in transgressing the law of Jehovah. ST NOV.16,1891