Recreation
Now, as in the days of Israel, every youth should be instructed in the duties of practical life. Each should acquire a knowledge of some branch of manual labour, by which, if need be, he may obtain a livelihood. This is essential, not only as a safeguard against the vicissitudes of life, but from its bearing upon physical, mental, and moral development. Even if it were certain that one would never need to resort to manual labour for his support, still he should be taught to work. Without physical exercise, no

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one can have a sound constitution and vigorous health; and the discipline of well-regulated labour is no  less essential to the securing of a strong and active mind and a noble character.

Every student should devote a portion of each day to active labour. Thus habits of industry would be formed, and a spirit of self-reliance encouraged, while the youth would be shielded from many evil and degrading practises that are so often the result of idleness. And this is all in keeping with the primary object of education; for in encouraging activity, diligence, and purity, we are coming into harmony with the Creator.

Let the youth be led to understand the object of their creation,--to honour God, and bless their fellow men. Let them see the tender love which the Father in heaven has manifested toward them, and the high destiny for which the discipline of this life is to prepare them,--the dignity and honour to which they are called, even to become the sons of God,-- and thousands would turn with contempt and loathing from the low and selfish aims and the frivolous pleasures that have hitherto engrossed them. They would learn to hate sin, and to shun it, not merely from hope of reward or fear of punishment, but from a sense of its inherent baseness,--because it would be a degrading of their God-given powers a stain upon their Godlike manhood.-- "Patriarchs and Prophets," pages 601, 602 .

The word of God is to lie at the foundation of all the work done in our schools. And the students are to be taught the true dignity of labour. They are to be shown that God is a constant worker. Let every teacher take hold heartily with a group of students, working with them, and teaching them how to work. As the teachers do this, they will gain a

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valuable experience. Their hearts will be bound up with the hearts of the students, and this will open the way for successful teaching.-- Review and Herald, Vol. 84, No. 30, 1907 .