Counsels on Diet and Food
Part I--The Original Diet

Chosen by the Creator

(1905) M. H. 295, 296 
111. In order to know what are the best foods, we must study God's original plan for man's diet. He who created man and who understands his needs appointed Adam his food. "Behold," He said, "I have given you every herb yielding seed,. . . . and every tree, in which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for food." Upon leaving Eden to gain his livelihood by tilling the earth under the curse of sin, man received permission to eat also "the herb of the field."

Grains, fruits, nuts, and vegetables constitute the diet chosen for us by our Creator. These foods, prepared in as simple and natural a manner as possible, are the most healthful and nourishing. They impart a strength, a power of endurance, and a vigour of intellect, that are not afforded by a more complex and stimulating diet.

(1864) Sp. Gifts IV, 120 
112. God gave our first parents the food He designed that the race should eat. It was contrary to His plan to have the life of any creature taken. There was to be no death in Eden. The fruit of the trees in the garden, was the food man's wants required. [FOR CONTEXT SEE 639]

A Call to Return

(Written 1890) E. from U. T. 5, 6 113. The Lord intends to bring His people back to live upon simple fruits, vegetables, and grains. . . . God provided fruit in its natural state for our first parents.

(1902) 7T 125, 126 114. God is working in behalf of His people. He does not desire them to be without resources. He is bringing them back to the diet originally given to man. Their diet is 

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to consist of the foods made from the materials He has provided. The materials principally used in these foods will be fruits and grains and nuts, but various roots will also be used.

Letter 3, 1884 115. Again and again I have been shown that God is bringing His people back to His original design, that is, not to subsist upon the flesh of dead animals. He would have us teach people a better way. . . .

If meat is discarded, if the taste is not educated in that direction, if a liking for fruits and grains is encouraged, it will soon be as God in the beginning designed it should be. No meat will be used by His people. [ISRAEL BROUGHT BACK TO THE ORIGINAL DIET--644] [GOD'S PURPOSE IN RESTRICTING ISRAEL'S DIET--641, 643, 644]

Part II--The Simple Diet

An Aid to Quick Perception

(1869) 2T 352 
116. If ever there was a time when the diet should be of the most simple kind, it is now.

(1880) 4T 515, 516 
117. God wants men to cultivate force of character. Those who are merely timeservers are not the ones who will receive a rich reward by and by. He wants those who labour in His cause to be men of keen feeling and quick perception. They should be temperate in eating; rich and luxurious food should find no place upon their tables; and when the brain is constantly taxed, and there is a lack of physical exercise, they should eat sparingly, even of plain food. Daniel's clearness of mind and firmness of purpose, his strength of intellect in acquiring knowledge, were due in a great degree to the plainness of his diet, in connection with his life of prayer [SIMPLE DIET CHOSEN BY DANIEL--33, 34, 241, 242]

(1885) 5T 311 
118. My dear friends, instead of taking a course to baffle disease, you are petting it and yielding to its power. You should avoid the use of drugs, and carefully observe the laws 

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of health. If you regard your life, you should eat plain food, prepared in the simplest manner, and take more physical exercise. Each member of the family needs the benefits of health reform. But drugging should be forever abandoned; for while it does not cure any malady, it enfeebles the system, making it more susceptible to disease.

Saving Much Suffering

(1868) 2T 45, 46 
119. You need to carry out the health reform in your life; to deny yourself and eat and drink to the glory of God. Abstain from fleshly lusts which war against the soul. You need to practice temperance in all things. Here is a cross which you have shunned. To confine yourself to a simple diet, which will preserve you in the best of condition of health, is a task to you. Had you lived up to the light which heaven has permitted to shine upon your pathway, much suffering might have been saved your family. Your own course of action has brought the sure result. While you continue in this course, God will not come into your family, and especially bless you, and work a miracle to save your family from suffering. A plain diet, free from spices, and flesh meats, and grease of all kinds, would prove a blessing to you, and would save your wife a great amount of suffering, grief, and despondence. . . .

Inducements to Simple Living

In order to render to God perfect service, you must have clear conceptions of His requirements. You should use the most simple food, prepared in the most simple manner, that the fine nerves of the brain be not weakened, benumbed, or paralysed, making it impossible for you to discern sacred things, and to value the atonement, the cleansing blood of Christ, as of priceless worth. "Know ye not that they which run in a race, run all, but one receiveth the prize? So run that ye may obtain. And every man that striveth for the mastery is temperate in all things. Now they do it to obtain a corruptible crown; but we an incorruptible. I therefore so run, not as uncertainly; so fight I, not as one that beateth the air. But I keep under my body, and bring it into subjection; 

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lest that by any means, when I have preached to others, I myself should be a castaway."

If men, for no higher object than a wreath or perishable crown as a reward of their ambition, subjected themselves to temperance in all things, how much more should those be willing to practice self-denial who profess to be seeking not only a crown of immortal glory, but a life which is to endure as long as the throne of Jehovah, and riches that are eternal, honours which are imperishable, and eternal weight of glory. 

Will not the inducements presented before those who are running in the Christian race, lead them to practice self-denial and temperance in all things, that they may keep their animal propensities in subjection, keep under the body, and control the appetite and lustful passions? Then can they be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust.

The Reward of Perseverance

(1905) M. H. 298, 299 
120. Persons who have accustomed themselves to a rich, highly stimulating diet, have an unnatural taste, and they cannot at once relish food that is plain and simple. It will take time for the taste to become natural, and for the stomach to recover from the abuse it has suffered. But those who persevere in the use of wholesome food will, after a time, find it palatable. Its delicate and delicious flavours will be appreciated, and it will be eaten with greater enjoyment than can be derived from unwholesome dainties. And the stomach, in a healthy condition, neither fevered nor overtaxed, can readily perform its task.

Let Us Advance

(1864) Sp. Gifts IV, 132 
121. A reform in eating would be a saving of expense and labour. The wants of a family can be easily supplied that is satisfied with plain, wholesome diet. Rich food breaks down the healthy organs of body and mind.

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Letter 309, 1905 
122. We are all to consider that there is to be no extravagance in any line. We must be satisfied with pure, simple food, prepared in a simple manner. This should be the diet of high and low. Adulterated substances are to be avoided. We are preparing for the future, immortal life in the kingdom of heaven. We expect to do our work in the light and in the power of the great, mighty Healer. All are to act the self-sacrificing part.

Health Reformer, August, 1866 
123. Many have inquired of me, What course shall I take best to preserve my health? My answer is, Cease to transgress the laws of your being; cease to gratify a depraved appetite, eat simple food, dress healthfully, which will require modest simplicity, work healthfully, and you will not be sick.

Camp Meeting Diet

(1870) 2T 602, 603 
124. Nothing should be taken to camp meeting except the most healthful articles, cooked in a simple manner, free from all spices and grease.

I am convinced that none need to make themselves sick preparing for camp meeting, if they observe the laws of health in their cooking. If they make no cake or pies, but cook simple graham bread, and depend on fruit, canned or dried, they need not get sick in preparing for the meeting, and they need not be sick while at the meeting. None should go through the entire meeting without some warm food. There are always cookstoves upon the ground, where this may be obtained.

Brethren and sisters must not be sick upon the encampment. If they clothe themselves properly in the chill of morning and night, and are particular to vary their clothing according to the changing weather, so as to preserve proper circulation, and strictly observe regularity in sleeping and in eating of simple food, taking nothing between meals, they need not be sick. They may be well during the meeting, their minds may be clear, and able to appreciate the truth, and they may return to their homes refreshed in body and

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spirit. Those who have been engaged in hard labour from day to day now cease their exercise; therefore they should not eat their average amount of food. If they do, their stomachs will be overtaxed.

We wish to have the brain power especially vigorous at these meetings, and in the most healthy condition to hear the truth, appreciate it, and retain it, that all may practice it after their return from the meeting. If the stomach is burdened with too much food, even of a simple character, the brain force is called to the aid of the digestive organs. There is a benumbed sensation upon the brain. It is almost impossible to keep the eyes open. The very truths which should be heard, understood, and practised, are entirely lost through indisposition, or because the brain is almost paralysed in consequence of the amount of food eaten.

I would advise all to take something warm into the stomach, every morning at least. You can do this without much labour. You can make graham gruel. If the graham flour is too coarse, sift it, and while the gruel is hot, add milk. This will make a most palatable and healthful dish for the campground. And if your bread is dry, crumb it into the gruel, and it will be enjoyed. I do not approve of eating much cold food, for the reason that the vitality must be drawn from the system to warm the food until it becomes of the same temperature as the stomach before the work of digestion can be carried on. Another very simple yet wholesome dish, is beans boiled or baked. Dilute a portion of them with water, add milk or cream, and make a broth; the bread can be used as in graham gruel. [SELLING CANDIES, ICE CREAM, ETC., ON CAMPGROUND--529, 530] [NEEDLESS COOKING IN PREPARING FOR CAMP MEETING--57]

The Picnic Lunch

(1867) 1T 514 
125. Let several families living in a city or village unite and leave the occupations which have taxed them physically and mentally, and make an excursion into the country, to the side of a fine lake, or to a nice grove, where the scenery of nature is beautiful. They should provide themselves with 87 plain, hygienic food, the very best fruits and grains, and spread their table under the shade of some tree or under the canopy of heaven. The ride, the exercise, and the scenery will quicken the appetite, and they can enjoy a repast which kings might envy. [AVOID EXCESS IN COOKING--793] [ADVICE TO SEDENTARY WORKERS--225] [SIMPLICITY IN SABBATH DIETARY--56]

Letter 135, 1902 
126. Let those who advocate health reform strive earnestly to make it all that they claim it is. Let them discard everything detrimental to health. Use simple, wholesome food. Fruit is excellent, and saves much cooking. Discard rich pastries, cakes, desserts, and the other dishes prepared to tempt the appetite. Eat fewer kinds of food at one meal, and eat with thanksgiving.

Simplicity in Entertaining

(1900) 6T 345 
127. Christ has given in His own life a lesson of hospitality. When surrounded by the hungry multitude beside the sea, He did not send them unrefreshed to their homes. He said to His disciples, "Give ye them to eat." Matt. 14:16. And by an act of creative power He supplied food sufficient to satisfy their need. Yet how simple was the food provided! There were no luxuries. He who had all the resources of heaven at His command could have spread for the people a rich repast. But He supplied only that which would suffice for their need, that which was the daily food of the fisherfolk about the sea.

If men were today simple in their habits, living in harmony with nature's laws, there would be an abundant supply for all the needs of the human family. There would be fewer imaginary wants, and more opportunity to work in God's ways. Christ did not seek to attract men to Him by gratifying the desire for luxury. The simple fare He provided was an assurance not only of His power but of His love, of His tender care for them in the common needs of life. 88

(1865) H. to L., ch. 1, 54, 55 
128. Men and women who profess to be followers of Christ, are often slaves to fashion, and to a gluttonous appetite. Preparatory to fashionable gatherings, time and strength, which should be devoted to higher and nobler purposes, are expended in cooking a variety of unwholesome dishes. Because it is fashion, many who are poor and dependent upon their daily labour, will be to the expense of preparing different kinds of rich cakes, preserves, pies, and a variety of fashionable food for visitors, which only injure those who partake of them; when, at the same time they need the amount thus expended, to purchase clothing for themselves and children. This time occupied in cooking food to gratify the taste at the expense of the stomach should be devoted to the moral and religious instruction of their children.

Fashionable visiting is made an occasion of gluttony. Hurtful food and drinks are partaken of in such a measure as to greatly tax the organs of digestion. The vital forces are called into unnecessary action in the disposal of it, which produces exhaustion, and greatly disturbs the circulation of the blood, and, as a result, want of vital energy is felt throughout the system. The blessings which might result from social visiting, are often lost for the reason that your entertainer, instead of being profited by your conversation, is toiling over the cookstove, preparing a variety of dishes for you to feast upon. Christian men and women should never permit their influence to countenance such a course by eating of the dainties thus prepared. Let them understand that your object in visiting them is not to indulge the appetite, but that your associating together, and interchange of thoughts and feelings, might be a mutual blessing. The conversation should be of that elevated, ennobling character which could afterward be called to remembrance with feelings of the highest pleasure.

(1865) H. to L., ch. 1, 55, 56 
129. Those who entertain visitors, should have wholesome, nutritious food, from fruits, grains, and vegetables, prepared in a simple, tasteful manner. Such cooking will require but little extra labour or expense, and, partaken of in 89 moderate quantities, will not injure any one. If worldlings choose to sacrifice time, money, and health, to gratify the appetite, let them do so, and pay the penalty of the violation of the laws of health; but Christians should take their position in regard to these things, and exert their influence in the right direction. They can do much in reforming these fashionable, health and soul destroying customs. [EXAMPLE OF CHRISTIANS AT THEIR TABLE A HELP TO THOSE WEAK IN SELF-CONTROL--354] [ELABORATE FEASTS A BURDEN AND AN INJURY--214] [EFFECT OF ELABORATE ENTERTAINING UPON ONE'S OWN CHILDREN AND FAMILY--348] [SIN OF SPARE DIET FOR FAMILY, AND EXCESS FOR VISITORS--284] [A SIMPLE DIET BEST FOR CHILDREN--349, 356, 357, 360, 365] [SIMPLICITY IN PREPARATION OF HEALTH FOODS--399, 400, 401, 402, 403, 404, 405, 407, 410]

Ready for the Unexpected Guest

(1905) M.H. 322 
130. Some householders stint the family table in order to provide expensive entertainment for visitors. This is unwise. In the entertainment of guests there should be greater simplicity. Let the needs of the family have first attention. 

Unwise economy and artificial customs often prevent the exercise of hospitality where it is needed and would be a blessing. The regular supply of food for our tables should be such that the unexpected guest can be made welcome without burdening the housewife to make extra preparation. [E. G. WHITE'S PRACTICE--NO EXTRA COOKING FOR VISITORS-- APPENDIX 1:8] [SIMPLE FOOD SERVED IN THE WHITE HOME--APPENDIX I:1, 13, 14, 15] [THE MENU TO BE VARIED FROM MEAL TO MEAL AND PREPARED WITH NICETY--320]

Think Less About Temporal Food

Letter 73, 1896 
131. We must be constantly meditating upon the word, eating it, digesting it, and by practice, assimilating it, so that it is taken into the life current. He who feeds on Christ daily will by his example teach others to think less of that 

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which they eat, and to feel much greater anxiety for the food they give to the soul.

The true fasting which should be recommended to all, is abstinence from every stimulating kind of food, and the proper use of wholesome, simple food, which God has provided in abundance. Men need to think less about what they shall eat and drink, of temporal food, and much more in regard to the food from heaven, that will give tone and vitality to the whole religious experience.

Reforming Influence of the Simple Life

(1882) 5T 206 
132. Should we dress in plain, modest apparel without reference to the fashions; should our tables at all times be set with simple, healthful food, avoiding all luxuries, all extravagance; should our houses be built with becoming plainness, and furnished in the same manner, it would show the sanctifying power of the truth, and would have a telling influence upon unbelievers. But while we conform to the world in these matters, in some cases apparently seeking to excel worldlings in fanciful arrangement, the preaching of the truth will have but little or no effect. Who will believe the solemn truth for this time, when those who already profess to believe it contradict their faith by their works? It is not God who has closed the windows of heaven to us, but it is our own conformity to the customs and practices of the world.

(1905) M.H. 47 
133. It was by a miracle of divine power that Christ fed the multitude; yet how humble was the fare provided,-- only the fishes and barley loaves that were the daily fare of the fisherfolk of Galilee.

Christ could have spread for the people a rich repast, but food prepared merely for the gratification of appetite would have conveyed no lesson for their good. Through this miracle Christ desired to teach a lesson of simplicity. If men today were simple in their habits, living in harmony with nature's laws, as did Adam and Eve in the beginning, there 

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would be an abundant supply for the needs of the human family. But selfishness and the indulgence of appetite have brought sin and misery, from excess on the one hand, and from want on the other.

(1875) 3T 401 
134. If professed Christians would use less of their wealth in adorning the body and in beautifying their own houses, and would consume less in extravagant health-destroying luxuries upon their tables, they could place much larger sums in the treasury of God. They would thus imitate their Redeemer, who left heaven, His riches, and His glory, and for our sakes became poor, that we might have eternal riches.

Part III--An Adequate Diet

Not a Matter of Indifference

[C.T.B.H. 49, 50] (1890) C.H. 118 
135. Because it is wrong to eat merely to gratify perverted taste, it does not follow that we should be indifferent in regard to our food. It is a matter of the highest importance. No one should adopt an impoverished diet. Many are debilitated from disease, and need nourishing, well-cooked food. Health reformers, above all others, should be careful to avoid extremes. The body must have sufficient nourishment. The God who gives His beloved sleep has furnished them also suitable food to sustain the physical system in a healthy condition.

(1905) M.H. 271 
136. In order to have good health, we must have good blood; for the blood is the current of life. It repairs waste, and nourishes the body. When supplied with the proper food elements and when cleansed and vitalized by contact with pure air, it carries life and vigour to every part of the system. The more perfect the circulation, the better will this work be accomplished. [RELATION OF ADEQUATE DIET TO SOUNDNESS OF MIND--314] [RELATION OF ADEQUATE DIET TO SOUND SPIRITUAL EXPERIENCE-- 324, PAR. 4]

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God's Bountiful Provision

[C.T.B.H. 47] (1890) C.H. 114, 115 
137. God has furnished man with abundant means for the gratification of an unperverted appetite. He has spread before him the products of the earth,--a bountiful variety of food that is palatable to the taste and nutritious to the system. Of these our benevolent heavenly Father says we may freely eat. Fruits, grains, and vegetables, prepared in a simple way, free from spice and grease of all kinds, make, with milk or cream, the most healthful diet. They impart nourishment to the body, and give a power of endurance and a vigour of intellect that are not produced by a stimulating diet.

MS 27, 1906 
138. In grains, fruits, vegetables, and nuts are to be found all the food elements that we need. If we will come to the Lord in simplicity of mind, He will teach us how to prepare wholesome food free from the taint of flesh meat.

An Impoverished Diet Discredits Health Reform

Letter 135, 1902 
139. Some of our people conscientiously abstain from eating improper food, and at the same time neglect to eat the food that would supply the elements necessary for the proper sustenance of the body. Let us never bear testimony against health reform by failing to use wholesome, palatable food in place of the harmful articles of diet that we have discarded. Much tact and discretion should be employed in preparing nourishing food to take the place of that which has constituted the diet of many families. This effort requires faith in God, earnestness of purpose, and a willingness to help one another. A diet lacking in the proper elements of nutrition brings reproach upon the cause of health reform. We are mortal, and must supply ourselves with food that will give proper sustenance to the body. [AN IMPOVERISHED DIET NOT RECOMMENDED--315, 317, 318, 388] [AN IMPOVERISHED DIET THE RESULT OF EXTREME VIEWS--316] [GUARDING AGAINST IMPOVERISHED DIET WHEN DISCARDING FLESH MEAT--320, 816]

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[SPIRITUAL EXPERIENCE NOT DEEPENED BY IMPOVERISHED DIET--323] [INSTANCE OF MEMBERS OF A FAMILY PERISHING FOR LACK OF SIMPLE, NOURISHING FOOD--329]

[C.T.B.H. 58] (1890) C.H. 155, 156 
140. Investigate your habits of diet. Study from cause to effect, but do not bear false witness against health reform by ignorantly pursuing a course which militates against it. Do not neglect or abuse the body, and thus unfit it to render to God that service which is His due. To my certain knowledge, some of the most useful workers in our cause have died through such neglect. To care for the body by providing for it food which is relishable and strengthening, is one of the first duties of the householder. Better by far have less expensive clothing and furniture, than to scrimp the supply of necessary articles for the table.

Adjusting the Diet to Individual Needs

(1902) 7T 133, 134 
141. In the use of foods, we should exercise good, sound common sense. When we find that a certain food does not agree with us, we need not write letters of inquiry to learn the cause of the disturbance. Change the diet; use less of some foods; try other preparations. Soon we shall know the effect that certain combinations have on us. As intelligent human beings, let us individually study the principles, and use our experience and judgement in deciding what foods are best for us. [NOT ALL CAN SUBSIST ON THE SAME DIET--322]

(1905) M.H. 297 
142. God has given us an ample variety of healthful foods, and each person should choose from it the things that experience and sound judgement prove to be best suited to his own necessities.

Nature's abundant supply of fruits, nuts, and grains is ample, and year by year the products of all lands are more generally distributed to all, by the increased facilities for transportation. As a result, many articles of food which a few years ago were regarded as expensive luxuries, are now 

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within the reach of all as foods for everyday use. This is especially the case with dried and canned fruits. [NOT TO LIMIT DIET IN ANTICIPATION OF TIME OF TROUBLE--323] [VARIETY AND NICETY IN PREPARATION--320] [ADEQUATE DIET IN OUR SANITARIUMS--426, 427, 428, 429, 430] [NO IMPOVERISHED DIET IN THE WHITE HOME--APPENDIX 1:8, 17]

Part IV--Diet in Various Countries

Suited to Season and Climate

Letter 14, 1901 
143. The foods used should correspond to the climate. Some foods suitable for one country would not do at all in another place.

(1905) M.H. 296, 297 
144. Not all foods wholesome in themselves are equally suited to our needs under all circumstances. Care should be taken in the selection of food. Our diet should be suited to the season, to the climate in which we live, and to the occupation we follow. Some foods that are adapted for use at one season or in one climate are not suited to another. So there are different foods best suited for persons in different occupations. Often food that can be used with benefit by those engaged in hard physical labour is unsuitable for persons of sedentary pursuits or intense mental application. God has given us an ample variety of healthful foods, and each person should choose from it the things that experience and sound judgement prove to be best suited to his own necessities.

Nourishing Foods Found in Every Land

Letter 135, 1902 
145. Let us make intelligent advancement in simplifying our diet. In the providence of God, every country produces articles of food containing the nourishment necessary for the upbuilding of the system. These may be made into healthful, appetizing dishes.

(1905) M.H. 299 
146. If we plan wisely, that which is most conducive to health can be secured in almost every land. The various

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preparations of rice, wheat, corn, and oats are sent abroad everywhere, also beans, peas, and lentils. These, with native or imported fruits, and the variety of vegetables that grow in each locality, give an opportunity to select a dietary that is complete without the use of flesh meats.... Wherever dried fruits, such as raisins, prunes, apples, pears, peaches, and apricots, are obtainable at moderate prices, it will be found that they can be used as staple articles of diet much more freely than is customary, with the best results to the health and vigour of all classes of workers.

A Suggestion for the Tropics

Letter 91, 1898 
147. In warm, heating climates, there should be given to the worker, in whatever line of work he is to do, less work than in a more bracing climate. The Lord remembers that we are but dust. . . .

The less sugar introduced into the food in its preparation, the less difficulty will be experienced because of the heat of the climate.

Tact Needed in Teaching Health Reform

Letter 37, 1901 
148. In order to do our work in straight, simple lines, we must recognise the conditions to which the human family are subjected. God has made provisions for those who live in the different countries of the world. Those who desire to be co-workers with God must consider carefully how they teach health reform in God's great vineyard. They must move carefully in specifying just what food should and should not be eaten. The human messenger must unite with the divine Helper in presenting the message of mercy to the multitudes God would save. [FOR CONTEXT SEE 324] [ESPECIAL CARE NEEDED IN NEW COUNTRIES AND POVERTY-STRICKEN DISTRICTS REGARDING MEAT, MILK, AND EGGS--324]

(1909) 9T 159 
149. We do not mark out any precise line to be followed in diet; but we do say that in countries where there are

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fruits, grain, and nuts in abundance, flesh food is not the right food for God's people.

(1902) 7T 126 
150. The Lord desires those living in countries where fresh fruit can be obtained during a large part of the year, to awake to the blessing they have in this fruit. The more we depend upon the fresh fruit just as it is plucked from the tree, the greater will be the blessing. [FOR CONTEXT SEE 397]

An Assurance of Divine Guidance

(1902) 7T 124, 125 
151. The Lord will teach many in all parts of the world to combine fruits, grains, and vegetables into foods that will sustain life and will not bring disease. Those who have never seen the recipes for making the health foods now on the market, will work intelligently, experimenting with the food productions of the earth, and will be given light regarding the use of these productions. The Lord will show them what to do. He who gives skill and understanding to His people in one part of the world will give skill and understanding to His people in other parts of the world. It is His design that the food treasures of each country shall be so prepared that they can be used in the countries for which they are suited. As God gave manna from heaven to sustain the children of Israel, so He will now give His people in different places skill and wisdom to use the productions of these countries in preparing foods to take the place of meat.

(1902) 7T 133 
152. It is the Lord's design that in every place men and women shall be encouraged to develop their talents by preparing healthful foods from the natural products of their own section of the country. If they look to God, exercising their skill and ingenuity under the guidance of His Spirit, they will learn how to prepare natural products into healthful foods. Thus they will be able to teach the poor how to provide themselves with foods that will take the place of flesh meats. Those thus helped can in turn instruct others. 

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Such a work will yet be done with consecrated zeal and energy. If it had been done before, there would today be many more people in the truth, and many more who could give instruction. Let us learn what our duty is, and then do it. We are not to be dependent and helpless, waiting for others to do the work that God has committed to us. [SEE ALSO 401, 407]