A Call to Medical Evangelism

Revive the Temperance Work

Messengers should be appointed who can present the Word of God from city to city upon the subject of temperance.--Manuscript 52, 1900. {CME 37.3}

The tame way in which the temperance question is being handled by our people is not in harmony with the necessities of the times. The work of making known our belief in matters of temperance should now be entered into most heartily.--Letter 302, 1907. {CME 37.4}

In the advocacy of the cause of temperance, our efforts are to be multiplied. The subject of Christian temperance should find a place in our sermons in every city where we labor. Health reform in all its bearings is to be presented before the people, and special efforts made to instruct the youth, the middle-aged, and the aged in the principles of Christian living. Let this phase of the message be revived, and let the truth go forth as a lamp that burneth.-- Manuscript 61, 1909. {CME 37.5}

An Opportunity for Young Men

Will young men now humble their hearts before God and give themselves to His service? Will they not accept the holy trust, and become light-bearers to a world ready to be consumed by the wrath of an offended God? {CME 38.1}

The use of intoxicating drink, which dethrones reason, and tobacco, which clouds the brain and poisons the life current, is increasing. Are young men prepared to lift their voices in the cause of temperance and show its bearing upon Christianity? Will they engage in the holy war against appetite and lust? {CME 38.2}

Our artificial civilization encourages evils which are destroying sound principles. And the Lord is at the door. Where are the men who will go forth to the work, fully trusting in God, ready to do and to dare? {CME 38.3}

God calls, "Son, go work today in my vineyard." God will make the young men of today heaven's chosen repositories, to present before the people truth in contrast with error and superstition, if they will give themselves to Him. May God roll the burden on strong young men, who have His Word abiding in them, and who will give the truth to others.--Manuscript 134, 1898. {CME 38.4}

Make Plain the Effects of Indulgence

It must be kept before the people that the right balance of the mental and moral powers depends in a great degree on the right conditions of the physical system. All narcotics and unnatural stimulants that enfeeble and degrade the physical nature tend to lower the tone of the intellect and morals. Intemperance lies at the foundation of the moral depravity of the world. By the indulgence of perverted appetite, man loses his power to resist temptations. {CME 38.5}

Temperance reformers have a work to do in educating the people in these lines. Teach them that health, character, and even life, are endangered by the use of stimulants, which excite the exhausted energies to unnatural, spasmodic action.--Ministry of Healing, p. 335. {CME 39.1}

Many May Be Saved From Degradation

I have been shown that the medical missionary work will discover, in the very depths of degradation, men who once possessed fine minds, richest qualifications, who will be rescued by proper labor from their fallen condition. It is the truth as it is in Jesus that is to be brought before human minds after they have been sympathetically cared for and their physical necessities met. The Holy Spirit is working and co-operating with the human agencies that are laboring for such souls, and some will appreciate the foundation upon a rock for their religious faith. {CME 39.2}

There is to be no startling communication of strange doctrine to these subjects whom God loves and pities; but as they are helped physically by the medical missionary workers, the Holy Spirit co-operates with the minister of human agencies, to arouse the moral powers. The mental powers are awakened into activity, and these poor souls will, many of them, be saved in the kingdom of God.--Medical Ministry, pp. 242, 243. {CME 39.3}

Pledging to Total Abstinence

The subject of temperance should be strongly presented, and a pledge to abstain from all intoxicating liquor and from tobacco should be presented. Habits of intemperance are preventing minds from discerning the importance of the truths which make men wise unto salvation. The brain must be cleared from the befogging influence of intoxicating liquor and tobacco, and then men will realize that Christ has died for their salvation.--Letter 187, 1904. {CME 39.4}

Responsibility of Parents

Often intemperance begins in the home. By the use of rich, unhealthful food the digestive organs are weakened, and a desire is created for food that is still more stimulating. Thus the appetite is educated to crave continually something stronger. The demand for stimulants becomes more frequent and more difficult to resist. They system becomes more or less filled with poison, and the more debilitated it becomes, the greater is the desire for these things. One step in the wrong direction prepares the way for another. Many who would not be guilty of placing on their table wine or liquor of any kind will load their table with food which creates such a thirst for strong drink that to resist the temptation is almost impossible. Wrong habits of eating and drinking destroy the health and prepare the way for drunkenness. {CME 40.1}

There would soon be little necessity for temperance crusades, if in the youth who form and fashion society, right principles in regard to temperance could be implanted. Let parents begin a crusade against intemperance at their own firesides, in the principles they teach their children to follow from infancy, and they may hope for success. {CME 40.2}

There is work for mothers in helping their children to form correct habits and pure tastes. Educate the appetite; teach the children to abhor stimulants. Bring your children up to have moral stamina to resist the evil that surrounds them. Teach them that they are not to be swayed by others, that they are not to yield to strong influences, but to influence others for good.--Ministry of Healing, pp. 334, 335. {CME 40.3}

A Clear Testimony Needed

Every churches needs a clear, sharp testimony, giving the trumpet a certain sound. If we can arouse the moral sensibilities upon the subject of practicing temperance in all things, a very great victory will be gained.--Manuscript 59, 1900. {CME 40.4}

Moses preached a great deal on this subject, and the reason the people did not go through to the promised land was because of repeated indulgence of appetite. Nine tenths of the wickedness among the children of today is caused by intemperance in eating and drinking. Adam and Eve lost Eden through the indulgence of appetite, and we only regain it by the denial of the same.-- Review and Herald, Oct. 21, 1884. {CME 40.5}

When temperance is presented as a part of the gospel, many will see their need of reform. They will see the evil of intoxicating liquors, and that total abstinence is the only platform on which God's people can conscientiously stand. As this instruction is given, the people will become interested in other lines of Bible study.--Testimonies, Vol. 7, p. 75. {CME 41.1}

As we near the close of time, we must rise higher and still higher on the question of health reform and Christian temperance, presenting it in a more positive and decided manner. We must strive continually to educate the people, not only by our words but by our practice. Precept and practice combined have a telling influence.--Manuscript 87, 1908. {CME 41.2}